Local Emergency Planning Committee

Under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA), Local Emergency Planning Committees (LEPCs) must develop an emergency response plan, review the plan at least annually, and provide information about chemicals in the community to citizens. Plans are developed by LEPCs with stakeholder participation. There is one LEPC for each of the more than 3,000 designated local emergency planning districts. The LEPC membership must include (at a minimum):

  • Elected state and local officials

  • Police, fire, civil defense, and public health professionals

  • Environment, transportation, and hospital officials

  • Facility representatives

  • Representatives from community groups and the media

The Vermilion County Local Emergency Planning Committee (LEPC) is a community-based organization that assists in preparing for emergencies, particularly those concerning hazardous materials. Under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA), the Local Emergency Planning Committee must develop an emergency response plan, review the plan at least annually, and provide information about hazardous materials in the community to citizens.  The LEPC membership must include (at a minimum):

  • Elected state and local officials

  • Police, fire, civil defense, and public health professionals

  • Environment, transportation, and hospital officials

  • Facility representatives

  • Representatives from community groups and the media

 

Some required elements of the community emergency response plan, developed by the LEPC, include:

  • Identification of facilities and transportation routes of extremely hazardous substances

  • Description of emergency response procedures in the event of an incident

  • Designation of a community coordinator and facility emergency coordinator to implement the plan

  • Outline of emergency notification procedures

  • Description of how to determine the probable affected area and population by releases

  • Description of local emergency equipment and facilities and the persons responsible for them

  • Outline of evacuation and shelter-in-place plans

 

Since the federal government enacted the Emergency Planning and Community Right-To-Know Act in 1986,

there have been 612 reported incidents of hazardous materials (hazmat) spills, leaks or releases that could have caused harmful and serious health problems for residents of Vermilion County.

 

 

 

1989 and 1998 each saw 37 hazmat incidents reported.  In 2012 there were only 7 incidents reported.  The average number of reported hazmat incidents from 1987 to 2015 was 21.1 per year.

 

The highest average occurred between 1987 and 1999 when 358 incidents were reported over 13 years, for an annual average of 27.5 per year.  Since 2000, the average has dropped significantly, showing an annual average of only 15.8 per year with a total of 254 reported incidents over the last 16 years.

 

 

Locations of Incidents Within Vermilion County

 

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